‘To prove that goodness could endure’ [book review]

A review of The Volunteer by Jack Fairweather It really is remarkable, the story of The Volunteer. Jack Fairweather’s Costa Award-winning biography, a work of impressive research, portrays the hitherto largely untold life of Witold Pilecki, a leader of the Polish resistance in World War II who in 1940 volunteered to be arrested and sentContinue reading “‘To prove that goodness could endure’ [book review]”

The Monthly Booking: July 2020

It was my birthday last month, which means that my shelves are happily groaning under the weight of yet more books to read. As such, I once again have a themeless reading month – it’s my aim to get my to-be-read shelf down to a manageable size before I buy anything new, although given theContinue reading “The Monthly Booking: July 2020”

‘Sand and courage and bombs and sleep’. A review of In Extremis: The Life of War Correspondent Marie Colvin by Lindsey Hilsum

I would love to know what my eighteen-year-old self would have made of this book. At school and university I spent a while thinking that I might like to be a foreign or war correspondent, partly inspired by the work of Martha Gellhorn which I had read for my degree courses. It was a dreamContinue reading “‘Sand and courage and bombs and sleep’. A review of In Extremis: The Life of War Correspondent Marie Colvin by Lindsey Hilsum”

‘Socks are really important’. A review of Confession with Blue Horses by Sophie Hardach

There is a striking conversation towards the end of Sophie Hardach’s Costa-shortlisted novel, Confession with Blue Horses. ‘History,’ says one character, ‘is written by adults.’ An obvious statement, perhaps, but all the more poignant when you really think about it. Because history is written by adults – not just in that they are the onesContinue reading “‘Socks are really important’. A review of Confession with Blue Horses by Sophie Hardach”

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